Monthly Archives: May 2012

Giveaway – Day 13 – Lyn Gardner & Helen Peters

Only 2 days left until we throw open the gates of Dairy Meadows and welcome you all in!

In anticipation of all the jollity to come we’ve got books and tickets to giveaway here everyday right up until the festival.  Each day will bring a new pair of star writers, and a new chance to win tickets to see them at Hay along with copies of their latest/biggest/most phenomenal books (full T&Cs below).

Today’s splendiferous writers are Lyn Gardner & Helen Peters.

We adore books about the theatre, Ballet Shoes and The Swish of the Curtain to name but two.  Imagine our joy then when we were able to programme two tip top authors at Hay chatting exactly that! The Secret Hen House Theatre and Olivia are very different (one is set on a farm, the other at a stage school), but they both have a warmth and sense of adventure that is truly irresistible.  And trust us, these ladies know their onions!

To be in with a chance to win leave us a comment telling us your favourite play.

Good luck!

Terms and Conditions

  • The competition is organised by Hay Festival.
  • Entry to this competition is open to everyone except Hay Festival employees and their close relatives.
  • Entrants must write a comment on the topic requested in order to qualify.
  • The personal data provided will only be used for the purposes of administering the competition.
  • The competition launches on Saturday 19 May 2012 and closes on Friday 31 May 2012 17:30. Submissions received outside of this timeframe will not be considered, so please do not wait until the last minute to upload your entry.
  • Only one entry, per person, per blog post is permitted. If more than one entry is submitted, only the entrant’s first submission will be considered.
  • Entries will be selected at random 48 hours after the post is published and winners will be notified on email.
  • Each goody bag will contain two books and two pairs of tickets, one child and one adult ticket for each event.  Prizes will be made available for collection from the festival Box Office.
  • Hay Festival reserves the right to amend these Terms and Conditions or cancel this competition at any stage, if deemed necessary in its opinion, or if circumstances arise outside of its control.
  • These Terms and Conditions are governed by the laws of England and Wales.
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Jonny Duddle: I ran away to sea

Our merry band of young writers, The Scribblers, posed some particularly brilliant questions to some of the artists appearing at Hay this year.  Over the next few weeks we’ll be bringing you their answers. A big ‘Yo Ho Ho and a bottle of pop’ to JONNY DUDDLE.

Describe your latest book in 5 words.

 Pirates move in next door!

If you had to pick one of your characters to spend the day with, which one would you choose?

 I think I’d spend the day with the pirate Dad. He likes fixing ships, and I like fixing old cars (especially old cars which are half made of wood). And I once lived on a ship for a year. When I finished college and couldn’t earn enough money illustrating, I ran away to sea. It was a big square-rigged ship, and we sailed it around the UK, dressed up in costume and showed schools and the general public what it was like to live on an old ship. I really enjoyed doing the maintenance work, painting, polishing, fixing sails, learning knots and climbing up and down the rigging. The pirate Dad spends most of his time doing fixing the ship in The Pirates Next Door, so I think I’d like to give him a hand. Some might say that he’s not dissimilar to me, and the the rest of the Jolley-Rogers bear uncanny resemblances to other members of my family. I’m not sure what they mean, but that’s what I heard….

Which writer, dead or alive, you would like to collaborate with?

 I’ve been reading all of Roald Dahl’s books with my daughter at bedtime. We’ve nearly run out of books to read, so it would be great to illustrate a new, undiscovered Roald Dahl book. His stories are so inventive and each one is very different. The two big problems are that Roald Dahl is unfortunately no longer with us, and Quentin Blake did such a brilliant job of illustrating his books already. I’m sure if Roald Dahl was still alive, he’d be sticking with Quentin Blake.

There are other classic books I loved as a child that I wish I could’ve illustrated, such as The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame (which has lovely illustrations by E.H.Shepard), Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll (which was originally illustrated by John Tenniel in the 1860’s, but then Arthur Rackham did the most amazing illustrations for the same story forty years later) and The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkein.

As an illustrator, I’ve worked with quite a few authors on book covers and interior illustrations for chapter books, and I’ve designed characters for games and films in great big teams, but I Iike developing picture books all by myself. I haven’t illustrated a picture book for anyone else yet, because it’s my opportunity to write. It’s my opportunity to get my own stories published. I’ll collaborate with somebody one day on a picture book, but I’ve still got lots of my own stories and each book takes ages, because I keep making the illustrations so big and complicated. I think because I aspired to write and illustrate my own books, most of my favourite authors, also illustrate their own books, so it’s difficult to think of someone I’d want to collaborate with, more than I would want to do a book all by myself. But I’m sure I could be tempted. My daughter’s favourite author, Julia Donaldson, perhaps…..

What’s the best thing about writing?

I’ve been writing stories since I was tiny, and most children I know do the same. Writing is all about having ideas and scribbling them down. It’s about making notes, re-writing those notes, re-writing them again, and sometimes again, and (in my case) doodling alongside those notes, until they become a story.

The best thing about writing, is that I can make ‘something’ of all the ideas and stories that fill my sketchbooks, and lie about my studio on scraps of paper. Most of my stories start out as drawings. ‘The Pirates Next Door’ was inspired by the name of my Art Director at Templar, Mike Jolley. On the train back from a visit to their office, I did a very scribbly drawing in my sketchbook of a pirate ship parked on the drive of a normal looking house, with a rowing boat and a treasure chest on the lawn, and a flag sticking out of the roof tiles. I thought if a ‘Jolley’ and a ‘Rogers’ got married, they could double-barrel their name into the Jolley-Rogers, which would be the perfect name for a pirate family. So from some scribbles in a sketchbook and a name, I showed my ideas to Templar. They liked it, and a year or so later, after lots of writing, phone conversations, a couple of meetings, a bunch of drawings and lots of colouring-in, we had a finished book. It’s so exciting to get a package in the post and pick up your own book for the first time. If I had never showed my ideas to anyone, they’d still be on scraps of paper dotted about my studio. But instead there’s a real book, with my story and illustrations and, rather bizarrely, there are people who read my stories to their children at bedtime.

Like my two year old daughter says: “Daddy’s job is colouring-in and writing stories.” To be able to make a living from scribbling and doodling is the best thing ever.

What’s your top tip for budding young writers?

Keep a notebook. If you like drawing too, you could call it a sketchbook, but it doesn’t really matter.  What matters is writing down your ideas when you have them. Five minutes later you might have forgotten them. I have my best ideas when I have space to think. Sometimes it’s when I’m sat in the garden listening to the birds, or when I’m lying in bed when I’ve just woken up, or I’m about to fall asleep. I probably have my best ideas when I’m walking. I like going for walks, especially if I’m having a difficult day with some writing, or an illustration. I don’t always have my sketchbook in my hand, so I’ve started recording ideas onto my phone too.

And show your ideas and stories to other people. They might say something that can make your story better. They might say they don’t like it, but that’s OK too. Ask them why they don’t like it, and if they have a point, maybe you could change it. But if one person doesn’t like it, it doesn’t mean nobody will, you might have just asked the wrong person. Some people don’t like my books, but lots of other people do.

Catch Jonny at the festival on Wednesday 6 June, 4pm.

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Giveaway – Day 12 – Mal Peet & Melvin Burgess

Only 3 days left until we throw open the gates of Dairy Meadows and welcome you all in!

In anticipation of all the jollity to come we’ve got books and tickets to giveaway here everyday right up until the festival.  Each day will bring a new pair of star writers, and a new chance to win tickets to see them at Hay along with copies of their latest/biggest/most phenomenal books (full T&Cs below).

Today’s acclaimed writers are Mal Peet and Melvin Burgess.

Mal and Melvin, two of the leading lights in YA Fiction, aren’t afraid of the truth.  In their latest work, Life: An Exploded Diagram and Kill All Enemies, they touch upon searing issues with a blend of feather-like sensitivity and raw honesty.

To be in with a chance to win leave us a comment telling us your favourite city.

Good luck!

Terms and Conditions

  • The competition is organised by Hay Festival.
  • Entry to this competition is open to everyone except Hay Festival employees and their close relatives.
  • Entrants must write a comment on the topic requested in order to qualify.
  • The personal data provided will only be used for the purposes of administering the competition.
  • The competition launches on Saturday 19 May 2012 and closes on Friday 31 May 2012 17:30. Submissions received outside of this timeframe will not be considered, so please do not wait until the last minute to upload your entry.
  • Only one entry, per person, per blog post is permitted. If more than one entry is submitted, only the entrant’s first submission will be considered.
  • Entries will be selected at random 48 hours after the post is published and winners will be notified on email.
  • Each goody bag will contain two books and two pairs of tickets, one child and one adult ticket for each event.  Prizes will be made available for collection from the festival Box Office.
  • Hay Festival reserves the right to amend these Terms and Conditions or cancel this competition at any stage, if deemed necessary in its opinion, or if circumstances arise outside of its control.
  • These Terms and Conditions are governed by the laws of England and Wales.
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Annie Dalton: Moonlight and magic and cupcakes

Sometimes I get a promising idea that stubbornly refuses to go away even though I can’t quite see how to turn it into a story. These half-grown ideas remind me of a grow-your-own-crystal kit one of my children was given for Christmas.  You suspended a piece of thread in a jar full of crystal-friendly chemicals and from these invisible beginnings, if you were patient, a seed crystal magically formed.

Sometimes something will happen that reminds me of one of my forgotten story seeds. I go wildly searching for it through scribbled-on scraps of paper. Often, when I eventually find it, my idea seems completely different to how I remember it, almost as though it had been written down by someone else.  I find myself impatiently crossing out parts of my notes, adding new thoughts, forgetting to finish my coffee, reaching for a fresh sheet of paper, rethinking the whole thing from scratch.

This might be the moment when I finally realise that the whole thing is a dead duck, best forgotten. Some ideas can’t be breathed into life no matter how promising they seemed at the start.  But others are simply waiting for the right moment to find their true eventual shape.

Over twenty years ago, my daughter Anna sent me a beautiful post card of otherworldly looking cats frolicking on a roof by moonlight. My imagination was immediately seized by this picture with its twilit colours of green and gold. Where did these magical creatures come from? Why were they visiting our world? Every now and then I took out this card and wondered dreamily about these moon cats. On school visits, when children asked where I got my ideas from, I sometimes produced my daughter’s post card, explaining that this was possibly an idea in waiting!

Two years ago, my agent Caroline Sheldon asked if I had any ideas that I could turn into a series for children, perhaps about a magical animal of some kind, and I remembered that magical moon cat card. I started to write the first chapter of a story about a mind-reading moon kitten, on his first mission to our planet. I called him ‘Moonbeans’. I wrote several first chapters about Moonbeans and deleted them all! None of my beginnings felt right until a nine-year old girl called Jax, aka Ellie Mae Jackson, came marching into my story. Jax was Moonbeans’s human sidekick, whose mum dreamed of opening a stylish cafe in a lively inner city area called Goose Green. I loved the idea that this cafe could become the base where Jax and her little moon cat would secretly help the humans of Goose Green to make their dreams come true. My story had finally taken off!

The finished stories have turned out to be very different from that first green-gold picture of moon cats gambolling in the moonlight. But that’s how it is with ideas. They’re just a starting point, a seed crystal that changes as it grows. The first two Magical Moon Cat books won’t actually be published until August but a special edition of these stories will be made exclusively available to festival goers at Hay.

In the meantime, why don’t you try making your own gorgeous, Moonbeans-inspired cupcakes? Just follow these easy and truly delicious recipes for the Moonbean’s magic cupcakes.

Catch Annie at the festival on Tuesday 5 June, 10am and 1pm

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Giveaway – Day 11 – Helen Stephens & Liz Pichon

Only 4 days left until we throw open the gates of Dairy Meadows and welcome you all in!

In anticipation of all the jollity to come we’ve got books and tickets to giveaway here everyday right up until the festival.  Each day will bring a new pair of star writers, and a new chance to win tickets to see them at Hay along with copies of their latest/biggest/most phenomenal books (full T&Cs below).

Today’s spiffing author illustrators are Helen Stephens and Liz Pichon

We first discovered the wonderful Helen Stephen’s in our local library.  Sat amongst all the picture books was the beautiful Night Iceberg, a charming little tale of sharing and penguins. Her most recent package of loveliness (The Big Adventure of the Smalls) has just been shortlisted for a Junior Design Award and we’re delighted to hear that she’s currently illustrating a Michael Morpurgo text set in Venice!

Liz Pichon stormed Hay last year and since then has swagged herself the Waterstone’s Children’s Book Prize 2012.  Her creation Tom Gates is the master of excuses and he’s back for a third round of mischief and mayhem in Tom Gates: Everything’s Amazing (Sort of).

To be in with a chance to win leave us a comment telling us your best excuse.

Good luck!

Terms and Conditions

  • The competition is organised by Hay Festival.
  • Entry to this competition is open to everyone except Hay Festival employees and their close relatives.
  • Entrants must write a comment on the topic requested in order to qualify.
  • The personal data provided will only be used for the purposes of administering the competition.
  • The competition launches on Saturday 19 May 2012 and closes on Friday 31 May 2012 17:30. Submissions received outside of this timeframe will not be considered, so please do not wait until the last minute to upload your entry.
  • Only one entry, per person, per blog post is permitted. If more than one entry is submitted, only the entrant’s first submission will be considered.
  • Entries will be selected at random 48 hours after the post is published and winners will be notified on email.
  • Each goody bag will contain two books and two pairs of tickets, one child and one adult ticket for each event.  Prizes will be made available for collection from the festival Box Office.
  • Hay Festival reserves the right to amend these Terms and Conditions or cancel this competition at any stage, if deemed necessary in its opinion, or if circumstances arise outside of its control.
  • These Terms and Conditions are governed by the laws of England and Wales.
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Helen Peters: Then there was my brother’s pet turkey, Gobbler…

I am so excited to be coming to Hay to talk about my new book, The Secret Hen House Theatre. The book is set on the Sussex farm where I grew up and the characters are based on my family and their animals. I’ll be showing you pictures of the farm and some of our crazier animals, as well as embarrassing childhood photos of my sisters and brother. (Without their knowledge or permission, of course, so if you know them, don’t breathe a word.)

One of the star characters in the book is an enormous tame sheep called Jasper, so fat that he most closely resembles a giant snowball. Jasper was my sister’s pet sheep; she bottle-fed him as an orphan lamb and he followed her devotedly around the farmyard for the rest of his life. He even had his own pet. I’m so happy that I’ve found a picture to show you of Jasper and his best friend, a duckling called Lucy who used to ride around the farm nestled into his back.

Then there was my brother’s pet turkey, Gobbler, who would let Mark carry him around in his arms like a baby. Not to mention his two goats who used to write me regular letters when I went away to university…

My dad has always totally encouraged the madness. In fact, he’s the instigator. He has a pet peacock called Percy, and has been known to drive to the greengrocer’s especially to buy Percy his favourite grapes. Percy has a nasty habit of pecking and scratching shiny blue cars in the springtime: he seems to see them as rivals. According to my dad, this is entirely the car owners’ fault: if they didn’t keep their cars so shiny, then Percy wouldn’t be threatened by them.

Life for the children in the book is a lot more dramatic than my childhood was. For one thing, their mother has died and their father barely even remembers they exist half the time. Their theatre in an old hen house has to be top secret because their dad has forbidden them to mess about in the farm buildings. And then they discover that the farm is in danger of being destroyed, and they have to hatch a top-secret plan to save it.

Our farm wasn’t in danger of being destroyed, luckily, but we did create a real theatre in a shed, complete with dressing room, stage and auditorium. I’ve dug out some pictures of the theatre to show you, too, including one of me in a rather fetching moustache. (It was part of the costume – I didn’t actually have a black moustache as a teenager. Honestly.)

I’m really looking forward to seeing you at 4pm on Saturday 9th June on the Starlight Stage. And if you happen to bump into my sisters or brother before then, please don’t tell them I’ll be showing you their embarrassing childhood photos.

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Giveaway – Day 10 – HL Dennis & Guy Bass

Only 5 days left until we throw open the gates of Dairy Meadows and welcome you all in!

In anticipation of all the jollity to come we’ve got books and tickets to giveaway here everyday right up until the festival.  Each day will bring a new pair of star writers, and a new chance to win tickets to see them at Hay along with copies of their latest/biggest/most phenomenal books (full T&Cs below).

Today’s wonderful writers are HL Dennis and Guy Bass.

Guy, the mastermind behind Dinkin Dins, is back at Hay with not one, but two brand new series – Stitch Head (pictured) and Atomic! He’s a complete hoot, so if you’re looking for lots of fun and laughter be sure to catch him.

HL Dennis is at the start of a very exciting journey.  She’s revealing book one of her six book series, Secret Breakers.  She’ll be helping us get to grip with codes and cyphers in her event. Take a peek at her very special blog post (just for us!) to find out more.

To be in with a chance to win leave us a comment telling us your favourite super villain.

Good luck!

Terms and Conditions

  • The competition is organised by Hay Festival.
  • Entry to this competition is open to everyone except Hay Festival employees and their close relatives.
  • Entrants must write a comment on the topic requested in order to qualify.
  • The personal data provided will only be used for the purposes of administering the competition.
  • The competition launches on Saturday 19 May 2012 and closes on Friday 31 May 2012 17:30. Submissions received outside of this timeframe will not be considered, so please do not wait until the last minute to upload your entry.
  • Only one entry, per person, per blog post is permitted. If more than one entry is submitted, only the entrant’s first submission will be considered.
  • Entries will be selected at random 48 hours after the post is published and winners will be notified on email.
  • Each goody bag will contain two books and two pairs of tickets, one child and one adult ticket for each event.  Prizes will be made available for collection from the festival Box Office.
  • Hay Festival reserves the right to amend these Terms and Conditions or cancel this competition at any stage, if deemed necessary in its opinion, or if circumstances arise outside of its control.
  • These Terms and Conditions are governed by the laws of England and Wales.
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Giveaway – Day 9 – Julianna Baggot & Catherine Fisher

Only 6 days left until we throw open the gates of Dairy Meadows and welcome you all in.

Pure by Julianna Baggott

In anticipation of all the jollity to come we’ve got books and tickets to giveaway here everyday right up until the festival.  Each day will bring a new pair of star writers, and a new chance to win tickets to see them at Hay along with copies of their latest/biggest/most phenomenal books (full T&Cs below).

Today’s wonderful writers are Julianna Baggot and Catherine Fisher.

Julianna and Catherine are both authors and poets who do a tremendous amount for their communities – Catherine in Wales as the Young People’s Laureate and Julianna in the US as founder of Kids in Need – Books in Deed.  Each of their books are completely compelling, so a word of warning, don’t open them up if you have to be somewhere – you won’t go!

To be in with a chance to win leave us a comment telling us your favourite word.

Good luck!

Incarceron by Catherine Fisher

Terms and Conditions

  • The competition is organised by Hay Festival.
  • Entry to this competition is open to everyone except Hay Festival employees and their close relatives.
  • Entrants must write a comment on the topic requested in order to qualify.
  • The personal data provided will only be used for the purposes of administering the competition.
  • The competition launches on Saturday 19 May 2012 and closes on Friday 31 May 2012 17:30. Submissions received outside of this timeframe will not be considered, so please do not wait until the last minute to upload your entry.
  • Only one entry, per person, per blog post is permitted. If more than one entry is submitted, only the entrant’s first submission will be considered.
  • Entries will be selected at random 48 hours after the post is published and winners will be notified on email.
  • Each goody bag will contain two books and two pairs of tickets, one child and one adult ticket for each event.  Prizes will be made available for collection from the festival Box Office.
  • Hay Festival reserves the right to amend these Terms and Conditions or cancel this competition at any stage, if deemed necessary in its opinion, or if circumstances arise outside of its control.
  • These Terms and Conditions are governed by the laws of England and Wales.
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Michelle Harrison: Five things I wish I had known before I was published

1. Writing never gets any easier.

I always imagined that upon completing a novel there would be some kind of revelation, some secret I’d unlock that could make it easier the next time round. There’s no such thing. Through trial and error I’ve learned that there are ways in which I work best, such as to a plan, although too much planning detracts from the enjoyment. However, each book presents its own challenges. While writing my trilogy, for example, I struggled with knowing how much back-story to put in each of the sequels. With my latest novel for teens I wrote from a first person male perspective, something I’d never tackled before. Writing is hard, and there are days when the only thing that gets me through is knowing that if I’ve completed a novel before, I can do it again.

2. It’s a full time job.

I spent almost five years working on my first book; a year for the first draft and another four rewriting it while I submitted to agents and publishers. I did this with a day job and it all fitted together nicely. When I got a publishing deal that quickly changed. Not only did I have a deadline for book two, but I needed time off for promotion (bye-bye holiday), and suddenly there were reader messages to reply to – fantastic – but time consuming none-the-less. Somehow, I managed all this and kept my full time job.

By book three I was struggling, tired from too many late nights – sometimes 2am with work the next day. Eventually I reduced my day job hours to part time. It was a huge help, and I coped much better for another year, yet still it wasn’t enough. With more rights sales comes more paperwork, additional edits, copyedits and proofreading on US editions of my last book, as well as working on the new one for the UK. It’s a constant juggling act. Something had to give, and so I took the decision to write full-time. I’ve no regrets: if the writing dries up one day then I’ll just have to find another job. For now, my books have back listed well and I believe I owe at least part of that to the amount of promotion/reader interaction I’m able to put in. There’s also the added bonus that as a children’s author a decent living can be made from school visit fees alone.

3. Expect discouragement.

For every handful of people who were enthusiastic about my writing ambitions there was always someone ready to deter or attempt to belittle me. ‘Still working on your little book?’ and ‘Do you really think you’re going to get this published?’ are two unhelpful phrases I recall. Strangely enough, the same people were only too quick to congratulate me with ‘I knew you’d get there in the end ’ once I got published . . .

4. Introvert? Not any more.

I’m a hermit when I write. I dislike noise, company (cats excepted) and conversation. The only voices I want to hear are those of the characters in my head. So after weeks and months of being holed up alone it can come as a shock to the system to have to emerge from the study and talk to people, large groups of people, about my work. This was an aspect I never gave much thought to before I was published. I’ve never felt the desire to be in the limelight, such as being on radio or TV and yet somehow I’ve overcome my nerves and done both, because I know I can’t reach an audience if they aren’t aware that my books exist. It gets easier with practise – and Rescue Remedy.

5. One letter can change your day.

If I’m struggling with my writing, or just feeling down in the dumps, there’s nothing that lifts my mood higher than hearing from someone who has enjoyed one of my books. Over the years I’ve had readers tell me that my stories have got them back into books, inspired them to write, and even served as an escape from harsh realities such as bullying and evacuation. When I set out to be a writer I didn’t expect my books to have that kind of effect on other people – it’s a great feeling.

Catch Michelle at the festival on Thursday 7 June, 5.20pm

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Giveaway – Day 8 – Celia Rees & Annabel Pitcher

Only 7 days left until we throw open the gates of Dairy Meadows and welcome you all in.

In anticipation of all the jollity to come we’ve got books and tickets to giveaway here everyday right up until the festival.  Each day will bring a new pair of star writers, and a new chance to win tickets to see them at Hay along with copies of their latest/biggest/most phenomenal books (full T&Cs below).

Today’s awe-inspiring writers are Celia Rees & Annabel Pitcher.

Celia Rees, best known for her hauntingly memorable historical titles such as Witch Child, has taken on a brand new direction with contemporary thriller This Is Not Forgiveness.  Packing in love, betrayal, faith and violence Celia weaves a taut psychological drama that is perfect teen reading for the summer hols.  Annabel Pitcher’s debut, My Sister Lives On The Mantlepiece, has been creating quite a buzz in the review pages and it’s not hard to see why.  With a unique sense honesty and clarity, this is a one-sitting book – you just won’t be able to put it down.  Both Celia and Annabel wrote lovely blog pieces for Hay Fever this month and we’re so looking forward to welcoming them to Hay.

To be in with a chance to win leave us a comment telling us the most dramatic thing to happen to you so far today.

Good luck!

Terms and Conditions

  • The competition is organised by Hay Festival.
  • Entry to this competition is open to everyone except Hay Festival employees and their close relatives.
  • Entrants must write a comment on the topic requested in order to qualify.
  • The personal data provided will only be used for the purposes of administering the competition.
  • The competition launches on Saturday 19 May 2012 and closes on Friday 31 May 2012 17:30. Submissions received outside of this timeframe will not be considered, so please do not wait until the last minute to upload your entry.
  • Only one entry, per person, per blog post is permitted. If more than one entry is submitted, only the entrant’s first submission will be considered.
  • Entries will be selected at random 48 hours after the post is published and winners will be notified on email.
  • Each goody bag will contain two books and two pairs of tickets, one child and one adult ticket for each event.  Prizes will be made available for collection from the festival Box Office.
  • Hay Festival reserves the right to amend these Terms and Conditions or cancel this competition at any stage, if deemed necessary in its opinion, or if circumstances arise outside of its control.
  • These Terms and Conditions are governed by the laws of England and Wales.
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